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Is Tokyo Safe, Japan Nuclear Crisis, Tokyo Radiation Levels

Govt did not reveal high level radiation estimate. Do you know how high?

Source: NHK WORLD English.

It has been learned that the Japanese government withheld the release of computer projections indicating high levels of radioactivity in areas more than 30 kilometers from the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

The estimates were made on March 16th following explosions at the plant by an institute commissioned by the government using a computer system called SPEEDI. The system made its projections on the assumption that radioactive substances had been released for 24 hours from midnight on March 14th, based on the available data.

But the government was reluctant to reveal the SPEEDI projections, and did not release them until March 23rd.

The released data showed that higher levels of radioactive substances would flow over areas to the northwest and southwest of the plant.

The estimates showed that the radiation would exceed 100 millisieverts in some areas more than 30 kilometers from the nuclear plant if people remained outdoors for 24 hours between March 12th and 24th.

That is 100 times higher than the 1 millisievert-per-year long-term reference level for humans as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

The Nuclear Safety Commission says it did not release the projections because the location or the amount of radioactive leakage was not specified at the time.

Professor emeritus Shigenobu Nagataki of Nagasaki University, says the government should release more data about the dangers of possible radiation exposure and draw up evacuation plans and other measures together with residents.

My quick analysis about the severity of the numbers

Let me admit that I have not done enough research, and my comment to follow is based on statements made only in the news article from NHK quoted above.

Observe the following statements:


The estimates showed that the radiation would exceed 100 millisieverts in some areas more than 30 kilometers from the nuclear plant if people remained outdoors for 24 hours between March 12th and 24th.

That is 100 times higher than the 1 millisievert-per-year long-term reference level for humans as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

Notice that the scientific exposure limit is 1 mSv/year.

Based on the above statements, the estimated radiation was 100 ms/day (1 day = 24 hrs, right?).

Extrapolate that to 365 days an year, and we have a radiation of 36,500 mSv/year. This was the “level of the radiation” that was forecast for areas even beyond the 30 kms range.

Notice that I said “level of radiation”, and not “extent of radiation”. The exposure would be limited to 100 mSv in a span of 24 hrs, which is still 100 times the total ANNUAL limit, but we are talking about a high dose within a very short span of time – a dose that is 36,500 times the average daily scientific limit if you divide the annual limit of 1 mSv by 365.

And they say it was perfectly safe!

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About Tokyo Nuclear Watchdog

I'm a foreigner living in Tokyo, Japan, and I have been impacted by the Japan Nuclear Crisis of March 11, 2011. Though the impact of the massive earthquake that was followed by an even more disastrous tsunami, which led to the nuclear crisis, was not as disastrous in Tokyo as it was around the Fukushima Nuclear Plants, there has not been sufficient data to prove that Tokyo is safe from nuclear radiation as is being portrayed by the authorities. This site aims at erring on the side of safety while it keeps a close watch on the crisis and how it affects those residing in and around the Tokyo (Kanto) region. Remember that the proper truth about radiation may only come out 5 or 10 years later when a classified file gets leaked out, but that will be too late for you to do anything about it if you were in Tokyo and had been through those radiation then (which as of this writing, is NOW). Do not believe the media. Trust your instincts, and make your own well-informed decisions about your safety. This site is here to help you, and your contributions are most welcome.

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